textile-museum:

Headbands from the Inca Empire, [insert date]. The Textile Museum 2009.2.1, .16, .13. Gifts of Robert and Maria Duff.
The three headbands shown above are part of a larger group of 43 said to have been found together in a weaver’s basket. They are unusual objects, and there are few similar objects in other collections. The upper band has a bold Inca zigzag and dot design, the lower one has coastal bird designs, and the center band combines coastal fish with an Inca “X-design.” When pieces of disparate style are found together, it normally means that the group was made at about the same time. If the date of one of the styles is known, it can be used to date the remaining items. In this case, the Inca style is well known and helps to date the bands with lesser-known coastal styles.
The pieces are all small, and not all of them are finished. They appear to have belonged to a weaver who was still working on them when she died. These objects are unusual­—bands of this size do not seem to have been a normal part of coastal costume. There are related long narrow warp-patterned bands in the Chancay style from the central coast, which may have been headbands, but not short ones like these. There are a number of Spanish descriptions of Inca costume that mention that women wore headbands, but few such headbands survive. Examples found at the central coast site of Pachacamac are narrow, like the center band, and slightly longer than those shown here. It is possible that not all Inca women wore such headbands, but it does appear that these particular bands might have been intended for this purpose. The finished Inca headbands have a tie cord extending from the middle of each end. However, these bands lack such ties, and so even if they are completely woven, they are unfinished in this sense. The bands with the Inca patterns have less complex patterns than those from Pachacamac and are more diverse in size, so it is likely that all the bands were woven by a coastal weaver. While small, they are beautiful examples of more unusual designs from the era of the Inca empire.
Ann Pollard Rowe, Research Associate, Western Hemisphere Textiles. Originally printed in our Fall 2011 Member’s Magazine 

textile-museum:

  • Headbands from the Inca Empire, [insert date]. The Textile Museum 2009.2.1, .16, .13. Gifts of Robert and Maria Duff.

The three headbands shown above are part of a larger group of 43 said to have been found together in a weaver’s basket. They are unusual objects, and there are few similar objects in other collections. The upper band has a bold Inca zigzag and dot design, the lower one has coastal bird designs, and the center band combines coastal fish with an Inca “X-design.” When pieces of disparate style are found together, it normally means that the group was made at about the same time. If the date of one of the styles is known, it can be used to date the remaining items. In this case, the Inca style is well known and helps to date the bands with lesser-known coastal styles.

The pieces are all small, and not all of them are finished. They appear to have belonged to a weaver who was still working on them when she died. These objects are unusual­—bands of this size do not seem to have been a normal part of coastal costume. There are related long narrow warp-patterned bands in the Chancay style from the central coast, which may have been headbands, but not short ones like these. There are a number of Spanish descriptions of Inca costume that mention that women wore headbands, but few such headbands survive. Examples found at the central coast site of Pachacamac are narrow, like the center band, and slightly longer than those shown here. It is possible that not all Inca women wore such headbands, but it does appear that these particular bands might have been intended for this purpose. The finished Inca headbands have a tie cord extending from the middle of each end. However, these bands lack such ties, and so even if they are completely woven, they are unfinished in this sense. The bands with the Inca patterns have less complex patterns than those from Pachacamac and are more diverse in size, so it is likely that all the bands were woven by a coastal weaver. While small, they are beautiful examples of more unusual designs from the era of the Inca empire.

Ann Pollard Rowe, Research Associate, Western Hemisphere Textiles. Originally printed in our Fall 2011 Member’s Magazine 

(via zomganthro)

archaeologydigit:

zomganthro:

archaeoblogs:

Archaeology Work in Hot WeatherSource: http://bit.ly/15aTffK (image)Last weekend, I participated in a conversation on hot weather health and safety on the CRM Archaeology Podcast. Most of us are aware of the dangers of working in hot weather (temperatures above 90 degrees), but we may not all be aware of measures we can take to prevent injuries. Knowledge of hot weather safety is essential for that works outside for long periods of time, especially CRM archaeologists, architectural historians, and heritage conservation specialists. I’ve provided a short PDF document you can download with a few tips on hot weather health and safety. Save this document………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project


This is just a nice reminder. Last week, I was the only person on my crew who DIDN’T get heat exhaustion on one day. I felt bad, because I was worried we were burning out the new kids too quickly!

This is great to know. On the dig I went on a few years ago nearly all of got some sort of heat induced injury. Mine was heat stroke, which was the most common; others was dehydration and low blood sugar was also quite common.

in my province, brutal heat is the norm during the dig season (between october and december) On the jungle, you’ll get 45° C during the day, a little less during the night, unbelievable humidity and monster mosquitoes. Oh yes, the perks of being and archaeologist

archaeologydigit:

zomganthro:

archaeoblogs:

Archaeology Work in Hot Weather
Source: http://bit.ly/15aTffK

(image)Last weekend, I participated in a conversation on hot weather health and safety on the CRM Archaeology Podcast. Most of us are aware of the dangers of working in hot weather (temperatures above 90 degrees), but we may not all be aware of measures we can take to prevent injuries. Knowledge of hot weather safety is essential for that works outside for long periods of time, especially CRM archaeologists, architectural historians, and heritage conservation specialists. I’ve provided a short PDF document you can download with a few tips on hot weather health and safety. Save this document………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

This is just a nice reminder. Last week, I was the only person on my crew who DIDN’T get heat exhaustion on one day. I felt bad, because I was worried we were burning out the new kids too quickly!

This is great to know. On the dig I went on a few years ago nearly all of got some sort of heat induced injury. Mine was heat stroke, which was the most common; others was dehydration and low blood sugar was also quite common.

in my province, brutal heat is the norm during the dig season (between october and december) On the jungle, you’ll get 45° C during the day, a little less during the night, unbelievable humidity and monster mosquitoes. Oh yes, the perks of being and archaeologist

fuckyeahcrystals:

scienceyeah:

tordles:

odditiesoflife:

The Fukang Meteorite

Back in the year 2000, an incredible meteorite weighing 2,211 pounds was discovered near Fukang, a city located in the northwestern region of Xinjiang, China. Named the Funkang meteorite, it was identified as a pallasite, a type of stony–iron meteorite. With 4.5 billion years in the making, its golden olivine mixed with silvery nickel-iron to create a stunningly beautiful mosaic effect.

Pallasites are extremely rare even among meteorites (only about 1% of all meteorites are this type) and Fukang has been hailed as one of the greatest meteorite discoveries of the 21st century.

It has since been divided into slices which give the effect of stained glass when the sun shines through them. It is so valuable that even tiny chunks sell in the region for $40 to $60 a gram. An anonymous collector holds the largest portion, which weighs 925 pounds.

WHO ELSE MISREAD THIS AS “THE FUCKING METEORITE”

fukang beautiful

God fukang dammit

(via mineralia)

mikey2k:

Spartacus: War of the Damned - “Victory”

the-absolute-funniest-posts:

My lovely followers, please follow this blog immediately!

damn right

(Source: sextective)

stfuprolife:


socoamarettolimeeee submitted:
I’m not sure if you have seen this or posted it but it is perfect.

Thanks for posting this!  We appreciate it.
-Hannah

stfuprolife:

socoamarettolimeeee submitted:

I’m not sure if you have seen this or posted it but it is perfect.

Thanks for posting this!  We appreciate it.

-Hannah

(Source: stfuprolifers, via neil-gaiman)

everydayimshoveling:

theolduvaigorge:

Fossils in Acheulean Handaxes

  • Top image: An Acheulean handaxe knapped around a Cretaceous fossil of the bivalve Spondylus spinosus (West Tofts, Norfolk, England).
  • Bottom image: An Acheulean handaxe knapped around an echinoid Conulus fossil (Middle Gravels: Swanscombe, Kent, England).

For further information see: 

(Image sources: Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology, London and The Geological Society, London).

WHAT

this is

so beautiful 

god damn

archaeology:

allmesopotamia:

World Heritage for sale!!!!
 
Clay Cuneiform Cone with Inscription in Sumerian, recording the building of the Temple to the city god NINGIRSU
$4000

Again, I find it tremendously disconcerting when sites which usually enthusiastically disseminate information abut the ancient world choose to promote the selling of unprovenanced antiquities.

This is bullshit. How come they sell “world heritage” in plain sight? they don’t know that selling archaeogical pieces is absolutely illegal, and most important, absolutely unethic?

archaeology:

allmesopotamia:

World Heritage for sale!!!!

 

Clay Cuneiform Cone with Inscription in Sumerian, recording the building of the Temple to the city god NINGIRSU

$4000

Again, I find it tremendously disconcerting when sites which usually enthusiastically disseminate information abut the ancient world choose to promote the selling of unprovenanced antiquities.

This is bullshit. How come they sell “world heritage” in plain sight? they don’t know that selling archaeogical pieces is absolutely illegal, and most important, absolutely unethic?

kristinahenning:

Oregon Sunstone

beautiful stone

kristinahenning:

Oregon Sunstone

beautiful stone

(via naturepunk)

collegehumor:

Scarlett Johansson Turns into Carrot Top During The Avengers
Prop comedy, super heroes, what’s the difference?





can’t be unseen

collegehumor:

Scarlett Johansson Turns into Carrot Top During The Avengers

Prop comedy, super heroes, what’s the difference?

can’t be unseen

(Source: reddit.com)

soularbloom:

Three of Tutankhamun’s Rings
(a) The green nephrite signet shows the King and Min.(b) The three-dimensional bezel is formed from a lapis lazuli scarab flanked by an inlaid falcon and moon barque on a cartouche-shaped base. The inlays are green jasper and glass.(c) The scarab bezel of the gold ring is of chalcedony; the underside shows Thoth and the udjat.

soularbloom:

Three of Tutankhamun’s Rings

(a) The green nephrite signet shows the King and Min.
(b) The three-dimensional bezel is formed from a lapis lazuli scarab flanked by an inlaid falcon and moon barque on a cartouche-shaped base. The inlays are green jasper and glass.
(c) The scarab bezel of the gold ring is of chalcedony; the underside shows Thoth and the udjat.

(Source: stellarfruit, via cennoreth)

5,205 Plays

ecocides:

Dave Brubeck - Take Five

(Source: rorschachx)